## The 10.10.10
* If you do the 10.10.10 exercise every morning, very soon reflection and awareness will become part of you
* 10.10.10 gets you up and going every day. It’s to put your mind in the right place. It’s to prepare you for the race. Our job is to give it our best ever every day, and when we do it we change the game dramatically.
* The process of the 10.10.10 has powerful consequences. It’s not the 10.10.10 itself, it’s how it prepares us for the rest of the day; to have an exceptional, great, day.
* The 10.10.10. changes your day
* One reason we start with 10/10/10 is to begin to understand the importance of time and that every second counts
* 10/10/10 sets your mind and efficiency in a particular order

## How to do it
1. 10 minutes of meditation. Sometimes I think about what I’m grateful for. Sometimes I think about the people most important in my life. Sometimes I just let my mind be still. I play this  [https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0vGlylfZOqgQd1Xl9qfcQE?si=bIG4_9yRSmK2P1t_ZWNnOA](https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0vGlylfZOqgQd1Xl9qfcQE?si=bIG4_9yRSmK2P1t_ZWNnOA)
2. 10 minutes of reading something positive. The 2 books I am reading currently are attached.
3. 10 minutes of journalling. The question I write at the top of each page: “What is going well in my life?” Example journal entry attached.

I hope the 10.10.10 serves you as well as it serves me

Making business decisions might be scary, but it is empowering to know that when I make those choices, I stand by me and I back myself.” — Kara Breadmore

Everything starts at the top. If you are not looking after you, as number 1, then you will never be able to operate a business the best that you possibly can. I make a conscious effort now to always make time for myself every day. I don’t nail it every day, but I am so much better now than I used to be. Going for a walk and taking 15 minutes to myself is an investment back in my business.” — Kara Breadmore

Do more. I’m not slowing down; I’m quadrupling everything we are doing.” — Mini Latif

There is nothing more powerful than being a single woman without a kid. You are the most powerful person in the room because that is someone who has a lot of energy.” — Mini Latif

We have invested tens of thousands of dollars in social media and we’re dumbfounded by it. We decided not to be distracted by it.” — Mini Latif

Social media is not what made the brand last the last 10 years. Our social media is there, we work on it, but we try not to be distracted by it.” — Mini Latif

We are so lucky to live in a country where as woman we have a choice where we can wake up and say, “I want to start a business today,” and, “I want to own a business today.” That choice, that freedom, to make that decision is so incredibly powerful and we are so lucky.” — Kara Breadmore

For me “making it” is freedom. The freedom in my future to know that I can go left or I can go right and there is nothing stopping me and that there are no blocks. It’s financial in a sense, I’ve got enough money, if I decide to go to Zimbabwe tomorrow, I’m going. No one can tell me otherwise. The reality is you do lose your freedom to a huge extent when you become an entrepreneur but you also gain freedom in other aspects.” — Mini Latif

With thanks to

Mini Latif is the Founder of Ottoman3. In this podcast, she reveals that as a 7‑year-old she thought everybody grew up to run a business. At that age, she also came up with the original concept for Ottoman3.

Kara Breadmore is the Founder of Ka’llure Jewellery. It was Jewellery that found Kara and became her passion. Kara explains how her business is not about making shiny things, but telling the stories of her clients.

About Masters Series by WeTeachMe

Masters Series is a show about inspiring entrepreneurs, creative thinkers, and visionary dreamers, and the stories behind how they built their companies.

Subscribe to show

Show brought to you by

Masters Series is presented by WeTeachMe.

Our strategic alliance partners: MYOB, SitePoint, and Entrepreneur’s Organization.

Our media partners: Startup Victoria and Digital Marketers Australia.

Our content partners: Written & Recorded.

The views expressed by the contributors on this show are linked websites that are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher.

Question of the day

What was your favourite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Foreword

One thing I have learned is that for the most part, people express the same idea but they express it in many different ways and with many different words. It is the details in the expression, the words, and combination of words used, that give a story its colour, its texture, and brings it–and its lessons–to life.

We are unique combinations of our beliefs, values and life experiences. Differences notwithstanding, we, and our experiences, are important. Therefore, there is value in compiling and sharing these stories and the multitude of ways in which ideas are expressed. Combined, these stories weave a wonderful tapestry that exemplifies just how rich and beautiful life can be.

And who knows? An inadvertent remark or detail in the retelling of a story can stand to attention and have an impact in the world of a reader. And with that exciting possibility, perhaps the most valuable thing I can do is create the space where the stories of those whom I admire and respect can be shared.

Below are people that I have come across on my own life journey whom I deeply admire and respect. Whether it be their tenacity or courage, or relentless drive or passion, each individual generously reveals a different lens in response to the questions I regularly pepper them with.

As we continue on our sharing over this anthology, I will share tidbits and anecdotes as to why I hold them in such high esteem, and what I love most about them. In turn, I hope that you do too.

Knowing what you know now, how would you have better prepared for COVID-19?

Declutter. Declutter. Declutter.

Andrea Grisdale, Founder and CEO at IC Bellagio, Board Member at Entrepreneurs’ Organization. Bellagio, Lake Como.

Had I known back then what I know today, I would:

  1. Declutter all aspects of my life and lead a much leaner life both professionally and personally
  2. Appreciate the simple things in life and appreciate the difference they can make to the day
  3. Take more time to fully think things through
  4. Juggle less balls
  5. Remove the “fat” from all aspects of my business

Ensure that your cash position is not skinny

Daniel Dickson, Managing Director at Amarco Enterprises. Sydney, Australia.

Ensure the balance sheet is in good condition, and the cashflow and cash reserves can support the business closing for X period of time (without the assistance of government subsidies and laying off staff). Ensuring that your cash position is not skinny going into a pandemic is the greatest business relief.

Also ensure that supplier agreements allow special dispensation in times of a pandemic.

Ensure your staff stay informed. It’s an enormous advantageous for people to not have uncertainty as to what is next.

Have a plan for the worst-case scenario

David Fastuca. Founder at Ambisie, Founder at Locomote. Melbourne, Australia.

Have a plan for the worst-case scenario. For example, what if your business had no revenue for 12 months?

Some questions to consider are:

  • If my business had no revenue for 12 months, what does this reality look like?
  • What actions need to take place so that my business survives?
  • How fast do I need to act?
  • What does my business need to look like so that it can survive 12 months without revenue

Embrace remote teams and cloud-based technology

Jamie Skella. Chief Operating and Product Officer at Mogul, Former Chief Product Officer at Horizon State. Melbourne, Australia.

I’ve had the privilege of building distributed teams and working almost exclusively with cloud-based systems for about a decade now; often with no office, no on-premise IT infrastructure, and have been a user of Zoom for more than half of that period.

The picture looks very similar within my current business, which has left me — let alone the entire company — in the fortunate position of frictionless transition into a COVID-19 world.

You could call this lucky; no one could have predicted this pandemic (although Bill Gates came close), but I’ve long been a believer in the stark benefits that flexible working environments enable. It felt inevitable that the world would follow suit.

However I did not expect that our hands would be forced in this manner, leading to an incredible acceleration of decentralised workforces and processes.

Satya Nadella, Microsoft’s CEO, summarised this new reality with a startling yet unsurprising remark on the company’s recent quarterly earnings call: “We’ve seen two years’ worth of digital transformation in two months.”

It’s what you do before the storm comes that most determines how you look after the storm passes

Kym Huynh. Founder at WeTeachMe, President at Entrepreneurs’ Organization. Melbourne, Australia.

I subscribe to the adage “fortune favours the prepared” (and the disciplined). The application of this idea in my life reveals itself in the strategic decision that I only enter battles that have been won before the fighting starts.

On being prepared, the main question I ask myself is: “Have we built disciplines in our personal, family and business that we live and breathe during both times of good and bad?”

On discipline, the questions I ask myself are:

  1. Business: Are the meeting rhythms set in stone, diarised, communicated and running like clockwork? (Daily huddle/weekly/monthly/quarterly/yearly.) Personal: Have I scheduled in regular check-ins with myself? Family: Have I scheduled in regularly touch-points with my family?
  2. Business: Do we have a regular communications cadence? (During bad times, increase the communications cadence.)
  3. Business/Personal/Family: Do we have cash buffers and reserves? (How long can my business/myself/my family survive without external assistance? How many months/years do we/I need so that we/I feel safe?) Is my business, my family and I maintaining the discipline of regularly setting aside a portion of the income in a difficult-to-access savings account?
  4. Are my key relationships strong? Cash and capital is oxygen, but the best kind of capital are my relationships. Business: Do I regularly check-in and cultivate the relationships with people and businesses that have a vested interest in my/my businesses’ survival and success? Personal/Family: Am I cultivating the relationships with the people most important in my life?

COVID-19 is not the first global pandemic and it won’t be the last global pandemic. We know with 100% certainty that there will be more, we just don’t know what they will look like and when they will appear. So when the inevitable storm hits, maintaining my discipline, and protecting the things that keep me disciplined, keeps me in good form.

The importance of time, and the importance of people

Raymond Chou. Founder and CEO at Infront Consulting APAC. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Time is a resource that once taken, cannot be returned. However, how many of us really shape our lives around this? COVID-19 taught me that there may not be a tomorrow so I like to do things now.

I also look into who I invest my time with, who I invite to join me on my life journey, and what I need to engineer in my environment so that I achieve my goals in structured and date-stamped manner (rest and relaxation included).

On people, I have taken the time given back to me during COVID-19 to be more honest with myself and really consider the people around me as they have an indelible influence on the shape of my life.

What do you think?

Do you agree or violently disagree with anything shared in this article? Or do you have any of your own stories that you want to share? Pop them in the comments and I will personally reply.

Call to action 

My goal is to help 1,000,000 people. My wish is to have these articles shared 1,000,000 times through the various social networks. For this reason, I provide this collection online for free and all I ask of you is this: If any of these articles have helped you in any way, please take a moment to share on social media, email to someone you think will find benefit, or print and leave it on the desk of someone whom you believe has the motivation, but lacks the tools to take themselves to the next level.

Don’t miss out on any new articles. Subscribe via email using the form at the bottom of this post and I’ll have the articles delivered straight to your inbox. Alternatively, you can also follow me on my various social media accounts: FacebookInstagramLinkedIn, and Twitter.

Make that investment in yourself. The more you level up and invest in your knowledge and mindset, the faster you can grow your company. The growth of your company is a reflection of you as a founder; of how much you know and of how much you’re learning.” — Nathan Chan

Be consistent with your content [in one channel]. Then move on to the next [channel]. One at a time. Be relentless on mastering one channel [at a time].” — Nathan Chan

Data comes first. When looking at your data, numbers don’t lie. Test based on your gut instinct but data at the end of the day is critical.” — Stephen Esketzis

Digital marketing comes down to 3 things: (1) Having the right offer. It’s got to be a high converting offer that resonates with your audience. Make it an irresistible offer; (2) Target customers. Be crystal clear on are your target customers are and how you will be reaching them. Because if you have the best offer but the wrong target market, they will not respond; and (3) The messaging of your copy. If you have the right offer and the right target customer but your copy misses, then they will not take action. It will be a dead campaign.” — Stephen Esketzis

Your network is your net-worth. If everything went to shit and you lose your business, your network is what will to stay with you. Having a strong reputation and nailing the relationships game is more powerful than anything else. Marketing platforms will change. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram might be gone tomorrow; this stuff comes and goes like the wind. The network is what’s going to stay.” — Stephen Esketzis

At the start of every year, I say to myself, “I am going to have a good stab at these goals. I’m gonna give it a good, hard crack for the next 12 months and see what happens.” — Nathan Chan

I remind myself, “I could be this close but if I give up now, that’s it. It is definitely over.” Keep mentally reminding yourself. You could be one campaign away in making something work. Same with business. You could be one opportunity away, or one person away, in turning your business around.” — Stephen Esketzis

With thanks to

Nathan Chan is the Founder of Foundr, the magazine that profiles entrepreneurs. Nathan started Foundr at the top by interviewing Sir Richard Branson — he then gave away that copy of the magazine to supercharge the Foundr brand. Since then he’s interviewed Arianna Huffington, Mark Cuban, Seth Godin, Tim Ferriss and he shares their insights and his own in this brand building masterclass.

Stephen Esketzis is the marketing funnel mastermind and Founder of Digital Marketers Australia. He launched his first business straight out of high school with the Meggle App which hooked people up with their nearest bar or nightclub. Building a 10,000 strong network for the app took Stephen deep into the world of digital marketing. Today he builds marketing funnels for businesses of all shapes and sizes.

About Masters Series by WeTeachMe

Masters Series is a show about inspiring entrepreneurs, creative thinkers, and visionary dreamers, and the stories behind how they built their companies.

Subscribe to show

Show brought to you by

Masters Series is presented by WeTeachMe.

Our strategic alliance partners: MYOB, SitePoint, and Entrepreneur’s Organization.

Our media partners: Startup Victoria and Digital Marketers Australia.

Our content partners: Written & Recorded.

The views expressed by the contributors on this show are linked websites that are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher.

Question of the day

What was your favourite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Culture isn’t about one certain element. It is not about having a cool space. I’ve worked with businesses with basketball courts, foosball tables, and drinks every Friday night. No one element creates culture and you cannot fabricate it. If you do not have the right people, the right leadership, and a clear vision, it doesn’t matter how cool you got in the business. These other things are like cherries on top of that which creates culture.” — Lisa Spiden

The fact that you have a business and that you have staff, you’ve got culture. Whether it is a good or a bad culture, you still have a culture that exists. You constantly monitoring and making sure it is where you want it to be. The core thing that influence culture is leadership.” — Lisa Spiden

Choose a model. Choose an idea. Choose something to fall on. I don’t have all the answers. I never have. I never will. But other people have done it. If someone has done it before, learn from them, grow from them.” — Tristan White

I had an interview with Emma Isaacs and I asked her, “What is the one piece of advice you wish you known a long time ago?” She said, “Believe in myself.” As I reflect on that conversation, I think about my own journey, that is one thing that I haven’t done. Believe in yourself. challenge yourself. Learn, grow, stretch, rest, and then do it all again.” — Tristan White

Have amazing people around you that you can bounce ideas off; like mentors, and people you trust that can help guide you. It helps keep you sane.” — Lisa Spiden

Recruitment is a dating process. We will try to decide if we want to spend more time with people. The first date moves on to a longer second date and to another date. And if things go well? You get married and you start working together.” — Tristan White

There are so many things we can learn, and it’ll be great learn them all in advance, but know where you are in that moment in time. Know the biggest challenge or the biggest bottleneck, dive into it head on, and then deal with it before moving on to the next challenge.” — Tristan White

If you want to reach out to someone who has commercial experience that you’ve either seen, know, or know that you will gain valuable experience from them, be straightforward. One sentence is great. Say, “I love your work. I’ve got a specific question. I’d like to ask you about X. Can I please have a small amount of your time?” — Tristan White

With thanks to

Tristan White founded The Physio Co in 2004. 5 years later he had 20 employees and what he calls a great big mess. After addressing his organisation’s culture, Tristan has grown from 20 to 150 happy, engaged and enthusiastic employees in less than a decade.

Lisa Spiden is the Founder and Managing Director of fibreHR and Roster Right. Working in HR in London and Australia, across banking, fast-moving consumer goods, IT and communication, Lisa has seen the best and worst of cultures. With a great culture comes discretionary effort from employees, which Lisa says is the best way for your business to set itself apart from the competition.

About Masters Series by WeTeachMe

Masters Series is a show about inspiring entrepreneurs, creative thinkers, and visionary dreamers, and the stories behind how they built their companies.

Subscribe to show

Show brought to you by

Masters Series is presented by WeTeachMe.

Our strategic alliance partners: MYOB, SitePoint and Entrepreneur’s Organization.

Our media partners: Startup Victoria and Digital Marketers Australia.

Our content partners: Written & Recorded.

The views expressed by the contributors on this show are linked websites are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher.

Question of the day

What was your favourite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.