Archives For Active Listening

Start tracking your time and see where you are spending your time. You don’t need to do it in a complex way. Just start by bucketing it. Email, admin, bookkeeping, just bucket it and see where time is going. Do it for 1–2 weeks and don’t give up; even if it’s difficult.” — Ben Sze

Taking the leap into my own business was very daunting because I didn’t want to give up the paycheck or a potential career in finance that I enjoyed. I recommend you keep a full-time job if you can, and moonlight on your startup so you can get it started. Doing this also has the benefit of not stressing your cash flow situation. We had a period where we were not paying ourselves and it was very tough.” — Ben Sze

Are we going to give this another crack or are we going go get full-time jobs, work half as much, and most likely earn more? What is the worst-case scenario in anything that we do; what is the worst that can happen? We are very fortunate here in this beautiful country in that we can easily take a chance. And if all fails you can go back and get a job. So the take a chance to go and pursue a passion and to pursue a dream. It’s a privilege that we all have. If you’ve got a dream or you’ve got a burning desire, take that chance because the worst-case scenario ain’t that bad.” — David Fastuca

Surround yourself with people that had been there and done that, and can help guide the way. You will still make a hundred mistakes; we made plenty. I remember in a year, we almost shut shop over 5 times. Then there were moments where is was Sunday, and payroll was Tuesday. Business causes a lot of stress. One of our proudest things throughout the whole Locomote journey was that we were able to fund the company, pay everyone, and never miss a payment even when things were dark. For us, Locomote was our opportunity, we didn’t know if we are going to get this opportunity again, we were not going to let it go.” — David Fastuca

Think of all these lateral sort of ways on how you can get financing. For example you don’t need $5M from day dot; you can start small to begin with until you get to that. Try and think laterally. If you have a gun to your head and couldn’t spend that sort of money, how would you do it? This is important because there will be times when you don’t have that money and you need to think like that.” — Dave Fastuca

Having mentors is important. We have mentors now, and had coffee with one of ours the other day. In that coffee we said, “We want to be cash flow positive in X amount of time,” to which he replied, “Be patient. If you can hold out in the long run and be patient, you can build something a lot bigger and better. It is good you have your goals and want to hit those milestones–we all want that hockey stick curve on that growth graph–but just make sure you have patience because then you can really build something great as well.” — Dave Fastuca

Go out and talk to your potential customers and pretend that you are going to sell them something. Get confidence that way. There’s no harm in speaking to potential customers. Maybe, don’t go speak to your premium, gold clients; go speak to your middle tier clients, and cut your teeth on figuring out how to pitch your business, and figure out if people will actually pay for the product or service you offer.” — Ben Sze

With thanks to

Ben Sze is a Co-Founder of Edrolo, an educational tech company that is creating better outcomes for students. Ben points out several key things that fresh founders should keep an eye on — not least of which is time. There’s a time management practice here that you’ll find invaluable.

David Fastuca is a Co-Founder of Ambisie, a business putting entrepreneurs in front of school students to broaden their horizons. David founded his first business at the age of 14 and it has had many different incarnations since then. He says we live in a lucky country where if all else fails, we can just go get a job — so have a crack at founding your own business.

About Masters Series by WeTeachMe

Masters Series is a show about inspiring entrepreneurs, creative thinkers, and visionary dreamers, and the stories behind how they built their companies.

Subscribe to show

Show brought to you by

Masters Series is presented by WeTeachMe.

Our strategic alliance partners: MYOB, SitePoint, and Entrepreneur’s Organization.

Our media partners: Startup Victoria and Digital Marketers Australia.

Our content partners: Written & Recorded.

The views expressed by the contributors on this show are linked websites that are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher.

Question of the day

What was your favourite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

I need to create space in my life for self-actualisation, to: (1) reflect; (2) define my core values; and (3) define the boundaries where I play.” — Ben Trinh

Your values are what you believe about the world. Your values are the boundaries and the ethical convictions that you consider true in your world. They are not going to be true for everyone and don’t expect them to be as such; they are just true for you. These are the lines you won’t cross no matter how big your business gets.” — Ben Trinh

What are the relationships immediately around you? Who do you bounce off and get energy from? Who do you share your problems with and do they deeply listen? These people are good first employees. They’re good for your first five employees because these people are the early doctors in your business. Our bookkeeper is a great example. When she came in through our doors she had never been a bookkeeper; she was a restaurant manager. But she said to me that she connected with our values, and wanted to be our bookkeeper. She was so clear in her vision that we hired her because you can train competencies but you cannot train character. Well.. you can.. it’s just a lot harder.” — Ben Trinh

You will need hope and vision because you will need both resilience and grit when things get tough. It will give meaning to those moments when you feel like giving up and so I’d encourage you to piece together and deeply understand your vision, your passion, and your strengths. Have a tangible, descriptive picture of what the world looks like when the problem you’re solving is solved. It should be inspiring. It should be something that gets you out of bed every day. This is what will get you through the tough times.” — Ben Trinh

Your business is your team; your clients; the people you surround with. A person by themselves do not make a business. Create a team around you that is based on your values and principles. When you say thank-you to the members of your team, anchor it in your values.” — Demi Markogiannaki

Listen. Always listen. Identify what are the actual problems are that people have. Draw on their feedback and create a solution that will solve their issue. When we did that at WeTeachMe, I knew we were on the right path because people were willing to give money for the solution that I created.” — Demi Markogiannaki

It’s never a good time and it’s never the right time. A lot of people approach me and tell me that they have an idea. Everyone has an idea. However, the person that wins is the person that executes the idea. In contrast, the person who over analyzes will one day turn 50 and they will still be analysing.” — Demi Markogiannaki

It doesn’t matter how many books you read, or how much you think, or how many notebooks you fill with bullet points about the things you plan to do. The important thing is that you actually do something.” — Demi Markogiannaki

In business, suffering is actually good. It’s what brings out the gems, it’s what builds character, it’s where you get your learnings, and it’s the way you humble yourself. So, I’d say in addition to hope, it’s about reframing our thinking around suffering.” — Ben Trinh

I love what Demi said about listening and being an active listener. How can I listen better so that I draw out the key insights? And how do I fail and get through this as fast as I can, so that I can get the learning gems?” — Ben Trinh

Jess and I were new graduates when we started the business and as new graduates, you know nothing. You have no shame asking for help because you come from a university environment where everyone needs to help each other so we had no shame asking for help and really latching on to feedback. We spent a lot of time reflecting and deepening our sense of self-awareness. You need the humility to be open-minded to other things and you also need to be an action person. It’s all great to be a philosopher and sit there and learn about the world, and how you’re terrible person or how you can be better, but if you don’t make your reflections a a tangibility in your life, then you’re not going be on that journey towards self-actualization.”  — Ben Trinh

With thanks to

Ben Trinh is the founder of Life Ready Physio & Pilates. Fresh out of university, Ben realised there was a fundamental problem in the physiotherapist’s business model. His solution has grown to 30 locations and over 300 employees in less than a decade.

Demi Markogiannaki is one of the founders of WeTeachMe. Demi worked with her co-founders to create a solution to help teachers find their students — but that wasn’t the solution they were looking for. After listening to their customers, WeTeachMe grew to become the go-to marketplace offering hundreds of classes to thousands of students.

About Masters Series by WeTeachMe

Masters Series is a show about inspiring entrepreneurs, creative thinkers, and visionary dreamers, and the stories behind how they built their companies.

Subscribe to show

Show brought to you by

Masters Series is presented by WeTeachMe.

Our strategic alliance partners: MYOB, SitePoint, and Entrepreneur’s Organization.

Our media partners: Startup Victoria and Digital Marketers Australia.

Our content partners: Written & Recorded.

The views expressed by the contributors on this show are linked websites that are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher.

Question of the day

What was your favourite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.