Archives For Motivation

Foreword

I have a confession to make: I get extremely excited every time I come across a creative person, or a person that holds within them such exuberance that it often manifests itself in a delicious cacophony of quirky character traits, unique stylistic choices, tangential thought patterns and behaviors, and an uncanny knack for seeing the world in a way that most do not, that when all combined, I find equally intoxicating and endearing.

For me, it’s the creatives that push the boundaries of what we collectively believe is possible. They dare to imagine, dare to dream, dare to believe, and in their own process of creation, create the world as they see it.

In this editorial series, I reach out to a curated list of creators who not only live and breathe the art of creation but undertake to pass on their learnings to the next generation of creatives. I find this combination of creativity and education noble, and use this editorial series as a way to delve deeper into these minds in the hopes that we too, can get a voyeuristic glimpse into the lives of such noble creatives. Who knows, perhaps we will learn something along the way too.

When you think about what you teach, what is the most memorable moment that comes to mind?

I will never forget looking out across the crowded room and the sea of happy faces, and how incredible it was to have grown from one small class to the enormous community of students and teachers we have today.

Adriane Strampp, Founder at Fitzroy Painting. Melbourne, Australia.

It was Sunday 15th December 2019. We were holding our annual student end-of-year exhibition in the studio and were also celebrating our tenth year in business. As I stood to give a speech celebrating the occasion I will never forget looking out across the crowded room and the sea of happy faces, and how incredible it was to have grown from one small class to the enormous community of students and teachers we have today.

Sue and her sisters were the catalyst for me moving The Humble Dumpling into the world of Zoom and understanding the amazing potential for technology to really make a difference in people’s lives.

Angie Chong, Founder at The Humble Dumpling. Melbourne, Australia.

I don’t really think of what I do as teaching.. at least not in the traditional sense. It’s more about the experience of simply sharing some knowledge I have about food and food culture with people who are open to listening and learning.

However, there is one very memorable moment I have from COVID 2020:

It was very early on in 2020 and I was still very skeptical about my ability to connect with people over the computer via Zoom. For me, the business has always been about making real connections with real people through food and I just didn’t think Zoom was an option for me until I met Sue and her sisters.

Sue and her sisters lived on a remote cattle station in rural central NSW. They appeared on my Zoom screen beaming and brimming with excitement about their first-ever cooking class. They lived thousands of miles from the nearest shop and further still from the nearest cooking class. I was fascinated and just as excited to be meeting and talking with them. I wanted to know about their life, their land, their thousands of heads of cows! It was like something out of “McLeod’s Daughters”. Truly, I was so excited to be “in their kitchen” hearing their stories that I almost forgot about the dumplings.

Within minutes, another sister in Brisbane and another in Hobart joined us, and together we laughed and cooked and ate. These beautiful sisters were the catalyst for me moving The Humble Dumpling into the world of Zoom and understanding the amazing potential for technology to really make a difference in people’s lives.

Sue and her sisters have certainly left a beautiful memory and image of teaching and learning.

We seated two ladies who shared an unusual name together. It was apparent their lives were woven together by more than just this workshop.

Belinda Galloway and Bree Hankinson, Founders at The Windsor Workshop. Melbourne, Australia.

One of our most memorable moments was having two gorgeous ladies do a weaving workshop with us. They both shared an unusual name, so obviously we thought it necessary to seat them together (as you do). As the morning progressed, it was apparent, their lives were woven together by more than just this workshop. Bree and I were thrilled to learn that they in fact stayed in touch after the workshop via a love for slow art and craft. We were even more delighted to see them turn up time and time again, together, for more of our creative workshops at The Windsor Workshop. THIS is why we do what we do.

Our memorable moments are when deaf children actually begin to sign to their parents so that the parents finally can understand what their children want to communicate. I feel blessed that I am able to make a difference.

Darren Roberts, Founder and Director at The Auslan Company. Melbourne, Australia.

When l teach l am thinking about the end result; what is the aim of the course and what do l want each student to achieve in this course. Then, how will l ensure that aim is met? This leads to the creation of the curriculum, the resources, and the methodology of teaching. The experience namely to be firm, to guide, and to ensure that the experience of learning is fun.

Auslan is fun. It is visual, it is a performance, and it is a movement that cuts across every spoken language on earth through the use of iconic signs.

Our memorable moments are when deaf children actually begin to sign to their parents so that the parents finally can understand what their children want to communicate. That’s the beginning of unique communication between hearing parents and their deaf children. I feel blessed that I am able to make a difference.

When past students approach me from behind a coffee bar and say, “Hey, David! Do you remember me? You taught me how to make coffee!”. There’s nothing cooler than seeing students of mine succeed in gaining meaningful employment in arguably the toughest city in the world to work as a barista.

David Seng, Director at The Espresso School, Board of Directors and Head at Barista Guild for Australian Specialty Coffee Association, World Certified Judge WCE WBC. Melbourne, Australia.

There are a few things I like to keep in mind when teaching:

  • Are my students engaged?
  • Are they understanding the content I am presenting?
  • Are they enjoying their time with me?
  • Are they able to successfully carry out the tasks assigned?

As a teacher, it is obviously difficult balancing all the different learning styles in one room, but if the answer is “no” to any of those questions, I will immediately change my teaching style to accommodate.

I have had many memorable moments in the classroom. However, many of them happen in interactions outside of the classroom in cafes where a past student will approach me from behind a coffee bar and say, “Hey, David! Do you remember me? You taught me how to make coffee!”.

There’s nothing cooler than seeing students of mine succeed in gaining meaningful employment in arguably the toughest city in the world to work as a barista.

Showing my mistakes and disasters modelled an experimental and risk-taking way of working which gave the students permission to do the same. The result was an outpouring of exciting and amazing work.

Graham Hay, Expert Ceramics Educator. Perth, Australia.

One that fundamentally changed my teaching was during my time at the National School of Art in Lahore. The National School of Art in Lahore is the second oldest university art school in Asia, and despite the students being exceptionally bright, they just didn’t seem to “get it”.

One day I had a crazy idea, and I created a slideshow of all my failures. Suddenly, the students started making amazing work. The learning here is that presenting only my best work, set impossible standards, so the students “gave up”.

Showing my mistakes and disasters modelled an experimental and risk-taking way of working which gave the students permission to do the same. The result was an outpouring of exciting and amazing work.

Now my demonstrations are sloppy and take unnecessary risks, and sometimes this approach backfires. But what students now expect is not to get it right every time, and to push through setbacks. Surprisingly demonstration accidents are also now a source of new ideas in my own work!

Throughout the introduction and demonstration, they were stony-faced and silent, which made me think that my class was going down like a lead balloon. So I was slightly dying on the inside. It wasn’t until they started playing with the techniques I was showing them that I realized they were just concentrating intently and that they actually were really into it.

Nadine Sharpe, General Manager at MakerSpace and Co. Sydney, Australia.

I was teaching a particular type of jewelry making to a class of 14–15-year-old young women. Throughout the introduction and demonstration, they were stony-faced and silent, which made me think that my class was going down like a lead balloon. So I was slightly dying on the inside. It wasn’t until they started playing with the techniques I was showing them that I realized they were just concentrating intently and that they actually were really into it.

They opened up, started chatting and asking questions, and at the end of the day, all told me how much they enjoyed the class. I walked away on a massive high, thankful I’d kept going, despite my internal panic. The moral of the story, while you need to read the room to understand if your class is meeting expectations and keeping everyone engaged, sometimes it’s best not to overthink it!

Teaching often reminds me of how joyful my trade is. My students bring the wonder, curiosity, and enthusiasm back into the workspace and this never fails to renew my passion.

Natalie Delaney-John, Founder at Rest in Pieces. Melbourne, Australia.

Sometimes I experience burnout in my profession. I forget what makes me love it because when one is a small business owner, one often gets stuck behind a computer doing admin or having to shoulder a lot of responsibility.

Teaching often reminds me of how joyful my trade is. My students bring the wonder, curiosity, and enthusiasm back into the workspace and this never fails to renew my passion.

My most memorable moments occur when people visit the store to pick up their online orders and take the time to thank me (and the team) for “saving them during pandemic“ and expressing how much they appreciated having our classes to break the hardship and monotony of lockdown.

Phil Hude, Founder at Armadale Cellars. Perth, Australia.

With the advent of COVID-19, we moved to create Zoom tastings with local and overseas winemakers and they took off like a skyrocket. My most memorable moments occur when people visit the store to pick up their online orders and take the time to thank me (and the team) for “saving them during pandemic“ and expressing how much they appreciated having our classes to break the hardship and monotony of lockdown. I feel very proud of my team and their ability to bring joy to so many during difficult times.

I never thought in my wildest dreams that someone would offer to pay me for something that I love to do each day.

Sarah Schembri, Director of Sarah Schembri Ceramics. Melbourne, Australia.

I’ve been fortunate to have been teaching for about the last ten years, and I say fortunate because I never thought in my wildest dreams that someone would offer to pay me for something that I love to do each day.

Teaching is such a rewarding and very satisfying experience for me on many levels. I love being able to share my knowledge and experiences with others who are willing and eager to learn.

I’ve taught many students over the years and have experienced many memorable moments, each one very special to me. What is most satisfying is being part of a student’s development, from their very first time on the wheel, being a part of their creative journey, and seeing their progress each week as they participate in classes working on refining their skills, ultimately with a goal of selling or exhibiting their own creations.

What do you think?

Do you agree or violently disagree with anything shared in this article? Or do you have any of your own stories that you want to share? Pop them in the comments and I will personally reply.

Call to action 

My goal is to help 1,000,000 people. My wish is to have these articles shared 1,000,000 times through the various social networks. For this reason, I provide this collection online for free and all I ask of you is this: If any of these articles have helped you in any way, please take a moment to share on social media, email to someone you think will find benefit, or print and leave it on the desk of someone whom you believe has the motivation, but lacks the tools to take themselves to the next level.

Don’t miss out on any new articles. Subscribe via email using the form at the bottom of this post and I’ll have the articles delivered straight to your inbox. Alternatively, you can also follow me on my various social media accounts: FacebookInstagramLinkedIn, and Twitter.

Foreword

One thing I have learned is that for the most part, people express the same idea but they express it in many different ways and with many different words. It is the details in the expression, the words, and combination of words used, that give a story its colour, its texture, and brings it–and its lessons–to life.

We are unique combinations of our beliefs, values and life experiences. Differences notwithstanding, we, and our experiences, are important. Therefore, there is value in compiling and sharing these stories and the multitude of ways in which ideas are expressed. Combined, these stories weave a wonderful tapestry that exemplifies just how rich and beautiful life can be.

And who knows? An inadvertent remark or detail in the retelling of a story can stand to attention and have an impact in the world of a reader. And with that exciting possibility, perhaps the most valuable thing I can do is create the space where the stories of those whom I admire and respect can be shared.

Below are people that I have come across on my own life journey whom I deeply admire and respect. Whether it be their tenacity or courage, or relentless drive or passion, each individual generously reveals a different lens in response to the questions I regularly pepper them with.

As we continue on our sharing over this anthology, I will share tidbits and anecdotes as to why I hold them in such high esteem, and what I love most about them. In turn, I hope that you do too.

Have you experienced burnout? If yes, what have you learned?

There were days where putting one foot in front of the other to come to the office in the morning was almost too much to bear, and when I did get to the office I spent far too long staring at the computer screen not doing much.

Andrea Grisdale, Founder and CEO at IC Bellagio, Board Member at Entrepreneurs’ Organization. Bellagio, Lake Como.

Absolutely yes. I experienced burnout 8 years ago and I remember it well. The biggest “thank goodness” at that time was that I had a coach at the time who helped me navigate what I was experiencing.

I was exhausted, fed up, lacked energy, and was overall in a negative state of mind and being. There were days where putting one foot in front of the other to come to the office in the morning was almost too much to bear, and when I did get to the office I spent far too long staring at the computer screen not doing much.

In spite of this, I felt I could not walk out on my team when we were on an “all systems go” mode in the middle of travel high season despite knowing in my heart of hearts that I needed a break.

Thankfully my coach at the time invited me to look at the situation differently and helped me craft my communication piece to my team, clients, and partners to advise them that after many years building the business, I was now at the point where I could step away from the office for a month to take a much-needed break.

To this day I can still remember how anxious I was hitting the send button.

The reaction I got was amazing. There were so many beautiful emails wishing me a well-earned rest, asking me to promise not to worry, and assuring me that they would go above and beyond to “do me proud” and make sure the business was as great if not better when I returned. And this is exactly what I found.

Taking a month away from emails, traveling, appointments, and feeling like I had to do things was the best thing I ever did. I would never hesitate to do this again should I feel it the right thing to do.

I have since learned to delegate, step away—even a couple of hours earlier than normal—without feeling guilty in any way, and understand that working crazy hours is not the way life is meant to be.

A healthy work-life balance is crucial to my success and my future and that of the business. If I am going to be the leader of the business that I want to be, it’s my responsibility to make sure I show up 100% always, and only I can put myself in a position to make that happen.

A business will always take everything you give it and want more. Set your boundaries and focus on the long game.

Ben Ridler. Founder at RESULTS.com. Auckland, New Zealand.

This is one that I’ve lived and learned from.

Entrepreneurs have appalling health stats. Start a business and expect to shorten your life by 10 years or so. Mental health stats are worse with two-thirds of us having one diagnosed mental health issue and some having 2.

After leaving my last business which was 4 years of major stress, my body shut down, I took time out to recover and learn and was fortunate to be living with a health genius, Dr. Vanessa Ingraham, a lifelong health researcher and born into a medical family. Amongst her many qualifications, she’s a naturopathic doctor with a fellowship in anti-aging and regenerative medicine.

As I got more interested in the health of entrepreneurs and my own health journey, Dr. Ingraham and I extensively researched having a business to support the health of entrepreneurs. The business never launched but as part of it, I completed year-long training as a health coach with the BulletProof Training Institute and as a human potential coach.

I have just turned 50, am in the best physical and mental shape of my life, and am getting ready for the intensity of another global play in the B2B software-as-a-service space. Here are a few of the key learnings in no particular order.

1. Doctors are traditionally sickness experts and not trained in nutrition, supplements, mindfulness, circadian rhythm, etc. Their primary role is to treat symptoms.

2. You need to take responsibility for your own health. No one else can do it.

3. What we do is stressful and you need healthy release valves. Alcohol is not a health release valve and it’s a poison consumed at the levels that we consume it at.

4. The gym won’t affect your weight. It’s what you eat and drink.

5. Fat is not the enemy; sugar is. The recommended food pyramid is bad science and has been long disapproved.

6. Good nutrition and health is a way of thinking. It’s adopting a philosophy and strategy, not tactics or magic pills.

7. Mindfulness is easy to do and easy not to do; like goal setting. It is the most beneficial thing that we can do if we choose to only adopt one new habit.

Most entrepreneurs sacrifice their health for their business then something happens and they are in the hands of the sickness industry. If one is serious about having a long career as an entrepreneur, one needs to learn how to manage stress and find healthy ways to release and take ownership of one’s own health. I’ve seen many of us go by way of heart attack and cancer—both lifestyle diseases—and I’ve done a lot of damage to my health with years of high stress, alcohol, an average diet, and extreme exercise.

Now I train very little, walk a lot, and my weight has been stable for 4 years (it used to fluctuate 10 kgs every year). I don’t diet, I eat amazing food, and I’ve slowly managed to get my hormones back into balance. I’m a biohacker, I track my own medical data, get blood tests done regularly, sauna, and get outside in the sun every day that I can. It’s not rocket science but rather mainly common sense. Look at how people live in blue zones and you’ll get the idea.

Finally, remember that a business will always take everything you give it and want more. Set your boundaries and focus on the long game.

The old adage that if you do what you love, you’ll never work a day in your life, isn’t quite the whole truth. The whole truth is that you’ll never stop working.

Jamie Skella. Chief Operating and Product Officer at Mogul, Former Chief Product Officer at Horizon State. Melbourne, Australia.

The old adage that if you do what you love, you’ll never work a day in your life, isn’t quite the whole truth. The whole truth is that you’ll never stop working.

Yet, indeed, it doesn’t feel like a “job”. These kinds of scenarios have never led me to burnout. My lived burnout experiences have been the result of politics.

There are many good reasons that many entrepreneurs dislike the organizational complexity cliff that occurs at about 30 staff, regret establishing a board, or even wish they’d stayed private. (Elon Musk famously regrets taking Tesla public.)

That’s not to say you shouldn’t do any of these things, but it’s important to go into them understanding what the ultimate costs of this kind of success can be… with the biggest price of all being that it might not remain something you love.

Doing something you don’t genuinely love, a lot is the clearest path to burnout.

A passionate life is like a candle. When it burns, it is so captivating and we are drawn to the flame. It is in that flame that we are captivated and when we focus too much on it, everything else dims in comparison, and yet we draw closer still. If we are not careful, we eventually get too close and we burn ourselves.

Kym Huynh. Founder at WeTeachMe, Former President at Entrepreneurs’ Organization. Melbourne, Australia.

When I share with others what type of life I want to live, I oft state, “I want to live a life that is extraordinary in every sense of that word, and to live life as passionately as one can.” I apply this philosophy to every aspect of my life including entrepreneurship, and at times it has been to my own detriment.

A passionate life is like a candle. When it burns, it is so captivating and we are drawn to the flame. It is in that flame that we are captivated and when we focus too much on it, everything else dims in comparison, and yet we draw closer still. If we are not careful, we eventually get too close and we burn ourselves.

I have learned that passion is very much a tool that we wield. And like all tools they can be wielded to aid us in our goals and pursuits, or they can be wielded incorrectly and hinder or harm us more than it helps us. And so when I look at our I have utilized the tool of passion in my life (or any other tool for that matter), I also look at how I mitigate against its adverse effects. Often, the mitigation is in: (1) rest; and (2) making sure that all 4 areas of my life are balanced; personal, family, business, and community.

I worked weeks with only 2–3 hours of sleep because sleep was a hindrance to my success. Suddenly, I started making mistakes. I was tired during the day, and I struggled to make decisions.

Raymond Chou. Founder and CEO at Infront Consulting APAC. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Burnout is something I experienced multiple times. To mention the words “multiple” makes me cringe in personal disappointment. Burnout is not fun because we get unmotivated, tired and our ability to think straight is impaired.

I burned out in the moments when I had a string of deadlines and felt that I had the responsibility of getting everything perfectly done. Even if a teammate completed the work, I still needed to be the one to put the cherry on the top and scrutinize the entire cake.

I worked weeks with only 2–3 hours of sleep because sleep was a hindrance to my success. Suddenly, I started making mistakes. I was tired during the day, and I struggled to make decisions. This general lack of productivity lasted weeks. The worst part? I sacrificed my health.

I learned the hard way that life is a marathon and not a sprint. We can push hard but we need to listen to our body and take rests.

I learned to have yin and yang; a balance of life. We work hard but we must also rest. I make sure now I get in a 30-minute high-intensity interval training session or a 5 km jog every day. I take time to read something that grows my mind, and I am diligent with my supplements.

Without health, we can’t do all the things we dream of doing. Health is the center of everything.

It took me a long time to realize that all the stress I felt was of my own design.

Ron Lovett. Founder and Chief Alignment Officer at Connolly Owens, Founder and Chief Community Officer at Vida Living, Author at Outrageous Empowerment. Halifax, Nova Scotia.

I’ve certainly had burnout throughout my entrepreneurial career and it’s taken some time for me to reflect on why.

I experience most of my burnout during the time I owned a private physical security company.

Back then I was an entrepreneur with all the answers. Thinking you have all the answers causes everyone around you to ask lots of questions. As I starting to build the business, it was very challenging to keep up with the demands of those around me combined with wearing multiple hats in the business. It took me a long time to realize that all the stress I felt was of my own design.

The point of burnout and escalating business challenges forced me to allow others to have the autonomy to answer their own questions. This culture transformation was the first step and allowed me to step back from the day-to-day so that I could move to a different role of guidance and strategy. That was a journey in of itself and for another time. However, I can tell you that I’ve never looked back nor experienced burnout since getting the company culture right.

To me, business is a game that is meant to be enjoyed, and it is a game that I learned to play as a child, and that enjoyment has never left me.

Tony Falkenstein. Founder and CEO at Just Life Group Limited, Founder and CEO at Just Water, President at Entrepreneurs’ Organization. Auckland, New Zealand.

To me, business is a game that is meant to be enjoyed, and it is a game that I learned to play as a child, and that enjoyment has never left me. The circumstances have changed, but so they changed when I went from the sandpit to play snakes and ladders, from riding my bike to playing Monopoly, or from crossword puzzles to computer games.

I often wonder how people can burn out from business; it is just playing a game. However, I do understand that we are not all born the same way. I personally don’t need a holiday, as my work is like being on holiday. I recognize that most others don’t operate the same way, as they play the game too intensely and emotionally.

What do you think?

Do you agree or violently disagree with anything shared in this article? Or do you have any of your own stories that you want to share? Pop them in the comments and I will personally reply.

Call to action 

My goal is to help 1,000,000 people. My wish is to have these articles shared 1,000,000 times through the various social networks. For this reason, I provide this collection online for free and all I ask of you is this: If any of these articles have helped you in any way, please take a moment to share on social media, email to someone you think will find benefit, or print and leave it on the desk of someone whom you believe has the motivation, but lacks the tools to take themselves to the next level.

Don’t miss out on any new articles. Subscribe via email using the form at the bottom of this post and I’ll have the articles delivered straight to your inbox. Alternatively, you can also follow me on my various social media accounts: FacebookInstagramLinkedIn, and Twitter.

One thing I have learned is that for the most part, people express the same idea but they express it in many different ways and with many different words. It is the details in the expression, the words, and combination of words used, that give a story its colour, its texture, and brings it–and its lessons–to life.

We are unique combinations of our beliefs, values and life experiences. Differences notwithstanding, we, and our experiences, are important. Therefore, there is value in compiling and sharing these stories and the multitude of ways in which ideas are expressed. Combined, these stories weave a wonderful tapestry that exemplifies just how rich and beautiful life can be.

And who knows? An inadvertent remark or detail in the retelling of a story can stand to attention and have an impact in the world of a reader. And with that exciting possibility, perhaps the most valuable thing I can do is create the space where the stories of those whom I admire and respect can be shared.

Below are people that I have come across on my own life journey whom I deeply admire and respect. Whether it be their tenacity or courage, or relentless drive or passion, each individual generously reveals a different lens in response to the questions I regularly pepper them with.

As we continue on our sharing over this anthology, I will share tidbits and anecdotes as to why I hold them in such high esteem, and what I love most about them. In turn, I hope that you do too.

What is failure in its greatest sense?

Failure to me means not taking that risk at all

Adam Massaro, Partner at Akerman LLP. Denver, Colorado.

Failure to me doesn’t mean taking a risk and not achieving the desired outcome. Failure to me means not taking that risk at all.

When you embrace risk, you have the opportunity of learning something invaluable about yourself (or others).

Failure, therefore, is knowing that you had the opportunity to move forward or fix a problem, but not taking the steps to do so.

Failure is not living your days the way you want to live your life

Arnie Malham, Founder and President of BetterBookClub.com, Author and Speaker at Worth Doing Wrong. Nashville, Tennessee.

To look back on life (at any age) and realize you have more money than friends, more regrets than adventures, or more hate than love might all singularly qualify as failure. From my perspective, the culmination of all three might be the trifecta of failure in the game of life.

But life comes at you fast and failure on a daily basis might not be so easy to spot in ourselves. I’d submit the argument that failure, much like success, accumulates over time. It accumulates in the seemingly small daily choices of life. Our diet and exercise (#YoungerNextYear), our reading and conversations (#CompoundEffect), and how we prioritize our most valuable asset, our attention (#Indistractable).

The uncomfortable truth is this: how we live our days is how we live our lives. Therefore, failure is not living your days the way you want to live your life.

Failure is not living a life with intentionality

Finnian Kelly, Founder of Intentionality, Inc., International Keynote Speaker, Area Director for Entrepreneurs Organization. Aspen, Colorado

Failure is not living a life with intentionality but living a life by the conditioned state of your societal, cultural and familial influences. Failure is when you operate in a default mode and where you don’t fully live in the present and enjoy the wonder that is life.

No success in life can compensate for failure in the home

Kym Huynh. Founder at WeTeachMe, Former President at Entrepreneurs’ Organization. Melbourne, Australia.

I am of the belief that no success in life can compensate for failure in the home.

The wonderful thing about life is that we have agency i.e., that we have the ability to choose, to craft a vision or determine our destination, to make intentional decisions that move us closer to our vision or destination, to reflect, learn and course-correct as we go, and to hopefully one day be at a place where we are at peace with our past, content with our present, and hopeful for our future.

Therefore, I suggest that life is not chance, but premeditation.

And with the basis that no success in life can compensate for failure in the home, we have within us the ability to build connected and successful families by giving the following: (1) love; (2) dedication; (3) patience; (4) sacrifice; (5) service; and (6) commitment.

P.S. Having a successful family is infinitely more fun than having a successful business.

Failure in its greatest sense is not trying, not starting that business, not approaching your crush, and not giving your idea an honest try

Randall Hartman, Founder at GROUNDWRK. Denver, Colorado.

One hears a lot of gobbledygook about failure in nearly every business success story and inspirational speaking event etc. For example: “My failures taught me insert-important-business-lesson),” or, “My failures made me the person I am today.”

In my opinion, failure in its greatest sense is not trying, not starting that business, not approaching your crush, and not giving your idea an honest try. The inaction is something you live with for the rest of your life and may be one of your greatest regrets when it’s too late.

If you are not failing you are not growing. I think this is particularly true for entrepreneurs.

Richard J Bryan, Founder at The Bryan Group Inc., Keynote Speaker and Author. Denver, Colorado.

I like the quote by Richard Branson, “If you are not failing you are not growing”. I think this is particularly true for entrepreneurs.

I remember needing to close a loss-making business and lay off all the staff in my home town of Bristol when I was 28. It was a harsh lesson about what can happen if one gets things wrong, but I learned a huge amount in the process that made me stronger going forward.

Failure is to not be the best to the people I care about, to never discover what my personal potential is, and to let happiness elude me in lieu of ego-driven activities

Ross Drakes, Founder and Creative Director at Nicework, President at Entrepreneurs’ Organization, Keynote Speaker, Host of One More Question Podcast. Johannesburg, South Africa.

The first is to not be the best to the people who I care about. So often we get distracted and stressed and take it out on those people who matter the most. Family and friends should not pick up the burden of the business.

The second is to never discover what my personal potential is. I am not talking about living to the standards of others but to live to ones that I myself define.

The first is to let happiness elude me in lieu of ego-driven activities.

It’s when we neglect the ability to reframe the negative as opportunities for insight and inspiration that we fail

Stu Swineford, Founder at Relish Studio, President at Anabliss, Partner at Forty105 LLC. Denver, Colorado.

Failure is not living up to one’s full potential, and accepting setbacks as permanent. Every moment holds opportunity for growth and discovery. It’s when we neglect the ability to reframe the negative as opportunities for insight and inspiration that we fail.

What do you think?

Do you agree or violently disagree with anything shared in this article? Or do you have any of your own stories that you want to share? Pop them in the comments and I will personally reply.

Call to action 

My goal is to help 1,000,000 people. My wish is to have these articles shared 1,000,000 times through the various social networks. For this reason, I provide this collection online for free and all I ask of you is this: If any of these articles have helped you in any way, please take a moment to share on social media, email to someone you think will find benefit, or print and leave it on the desk of someone whom you believe has the motivation, but lacks the tools to take themselves to the next level.

Don’t miss out on any new articles. Subscribe via email using the form at the bottom of this post and I’ll have the articles delivered straight to your inbox. Alternatively, you can also follow me on my various social media accounts: FacebookInstagramLinkedIn, and Twitter.

One thing I have learned is that for the most part, people express the same idea but they express it in many different ways and with many different words. It is the details in the expression, the words, and combination of words used, that give a story its colour, its texture, and brings it–and its lessons–to life.

We are unique combinations of our beliefs, values and life experiences. Differences notwithstanding, we, and our experiences, are important. Therefore, there is value in compiling and sharing these stories and the multitude of ways in which ideas are expressed. Combined, these stories weave a wonderful tapestry that exemplifies just how rich and beautiful life can be.

And who knows? An inadvertent remark or detail in the retelling of a story can stand to attention and have an impact in the world of a reader. And with that exciting possibility, perhaps the most valuable thing I can do is create the space where the stories of those whom I admire and respect can be shared.

Below are people that I have come across on my own life journey whom I deeply admire and respect. Whether it be their tenacity or courage, or relentless drive or passion, each individual generously reveals a different lens in response to the questions I regularly pepper them with.

As we continue on our sharing over this anthology, I will share tidbits and anecdotes as to why I hold them in such high esteem, and what I love most about them. In turn, I hope that you do too.

What does success look like to you?

Success on every front can often be tied to the books we read and the people we meet

Arnie Malham, Founder and President of BetterBookClub.com, Author and Speaker at Worth Doing Wrong. Nashville, Tennessee.

There are many forms of “success”: personal; parental; spiritual; spousal; and financial (just to name a few).

For me “business success” appeared when I began to understand the difference in being a “solopreneur” and being an “entrepreneur” #TheEMyth. “Entrepreneurial success” appeared when I began caring more about asking the “right questions” than having the “right answers” #ScalingUp. And “leadership success” appeared when I began thinking more like a “leader” in my company and less like a “boss” #GreatbyChoice.

Ultimately, success on every front can often be tied to the books we read and the people we meet. I certainly wish everyone great and abundant adventures in both.

Success is the ability to find time again so that you can do all the things you really want to do

Ash Rathod, Managing Director of Digital Focus Creatives. Leicester, United Kingdom.

I define success has the ability to find time again so that you can do all the things you really want to do. Whether it be personal or business, these are things that you do not because you need to do them, but because you want to do them.

The true meaning of success is asking yourself every day, “Am I living a life of Intentionality?”

Finnian Kelly, President at Entrepreneurs’ Organization, Founder at Intentionality, Founder at Wealth Enhancers. Boulder, Colorado

Success to me is about not having regrets. This doesn’t mean you can’t have mistakes—mistakes are natural—but rather how you respond to the mistakes and set yourself up for a different course of action in the future.

For me, the true meaning of success is asking yourself every day, “Am I living a life of Intentionality?” This means deciding how you want to feel and then taking deliberate action forwards.

I believe that the key to success is when one can identify if their entrepreneurial journey is aligned with their spiritual journey. That’s much more important than scaling a company to $100M.

The amount of financial success won’t matter at all if my home life, my health, or my mindset isn’t good

Katty Douraghy, President at Artisan Creative, Author at The Butterfly Years. Los Angeles, California.

Success means inner and outer harmony; personally and professionally. The amount of financial success won’t matter at all if my home life, my health, or my mindset isn’t good.

Success means happiness, fulfillment and contribution to something bigger than me.

Success is the creation of a life where we all walk each other home

Kym Huynh. Founder at WeTeachMe, Former President at Entrepreneurs’ Organization. Melbourne, Australia.

Success to me is the realization that every one of us have agency i.e., the ability to decide, and that we have the ability to determine how we see, and how we experience, the world.

Firstly, the understanding that when we change the way we see the world, our world changes. This understanding has given me choice in how I look at my life experiences, and subsequently how I experience life.

Secondly, the realization that we can’t change our past but we can create our future. And that we have the ability to envision a future; one that is hopefully so bright and vivid that it becomes a guiding light for all our life decisions.

Thirdly, the empowerment in knowing that the great thing about life is that we don’t have to look like what we want to become but rather, it’s all about heart and desire and skill. Satisfy those three requirements and the destination is inevitable.

And finally, the grace in knowing that as per the wisdom of David O. McKay, no success in life compensates for failure in the home.

And whilst home can mean “home” in the nuclear sense, if we include our friends, our communities and the lives we touch, and build a life where we lift each other, then perhaps we can create a life where we all walk each other home.

My philosophy is you need enough money to do the things you want to do but you also need enough time to enjoy it

Richard J Bryan, Founder at The Bryan Group Inc., Keynote Speaker and Author. Denver, Colorado.

Success is all about the freedom to choose how I spend my time both personally and professionally. When I became the CEO of our family business at the age of 28, I did it out of a sense of duty and not necessarily because it was what I wanted to do. My philosophy is you need enough money to do the things you want to do but you also need enough time to enjoy it.

I measure success in my late 40’s by what sort of legacy and positive impact I can leave behind

Steven Ziegler, Founder at Z3 Talent, Founder at ConstructionJobsColorado.com. Denver, Colorado.

In my 20’s and for much of my 30’s I was consumed with how much money and financial wealth I could create. Although those items are still important to me, I measure success in my late 40’s by what sort of legacy and positive impact I can leave behind. I’m certain this has a lot to do with the fact I have 3 kids and I am getting older!

I judge my successes by the positive effect I have on the wellbeing of others

Stu Swineford, Founder at Relish Studio, President at Anabliss, Partner at Forty105 LLC. Denver, Colorado.

I get the most joy out of knowing I have helped someone level up. Whether that’s making an introduction, shining a light on a solution to a problem they are facing, or helping them reach their goals and establish even bigger objectives, I get a ton of good vibes knowing that I was part of that success.

I judge my successes by the positive effect I have on the wellbeing of others. That and knowing I have given my all in an activity or objective. Because at the end of the day, that’s all we can do.

At the start I wore 20 hats. I drew a line in the sand and stated that once successful, I would be wearing 1 hat, and that hat is “owner”.

Tim Glennie, Co-Founder & Managing Partner at BridgeView. Denver, Colorado.

It is important to define success at the start of your entrepreneur journey.

My goal was simple. At the start I wore 20 hats. I drew a line in the sand and stated that once successful, I would be wearing 1 hat, and that hat is “owner”.

Success meant creating a business that could scale and have the proper processes and systems to operate without a dependency on an owner.

What do you think?

Do you agree or violently disagree with anything shared in this article? Or do you have any of your own stories that you want to share? Pop them in the comments and I will personally reply.

Call to action 

My goal is to help 1,000,000 people. My wish is to have these articles shared 1,000,000 times through the various social networks. For this reason, I provide this collection online for free and all I ask of you is this: If any of these articles have helped you in any way, please take a moment to share on social media, email to someone you think will find benefit, or print and leave it on the desk of someone whom you believe has the motivation, but lacks the tools to take themselves to the next level.

Don’t miss out on any new articles. Subscribe via email using the form at the bottom of this post and I’ll have the articles delivered straight to your inbox. Alternatively, you can also follow me on my various social media accounts: FacebookInstagramLinkedIn, and Twitter.

Foreword

I have a confession to make: I get extremely excited every time I come across a creative person, or a person that holds within them such exuberance that it often manifests itself in a delicious cacophony of quirky character traits, unique stylistic choices, tangential thought patterns and behaviors, and an uncanny knack for seeing the world in a way that most do not, that when all combined, I find equally intoxicating and endearing.

For me, it’s the creatives that push the boundaries of what we collectively believe is possible. They dare to imagine, dare to dream, dare to believe, and in their own process of creation, create the world as they see it.

In this editorial series, I reach out to a curated list of creators who not only live and breathe the art of creation but undertake to pass on their learnings to the next generation of creatives. I find this combination of creativity and education noble, and use this editorial series as a way to delve deeper into these minds in the hopes that we too, can get a voyeuristic glimpse into the lives of such noble creatives. Who knows, perhaps we will learn something along the way too.

How did your classes and workshops come to be? Why do you teach?

I started teaching these techniques initially to my own trainees, then in TAFE and University courses then in my small Fitzroy studio as a way to pass on the important things I had learnt. Now, three decades later, and having established Slow Clay Centre nine years ago, I am still teaching these techniques!

Jane Sawyer, Founder at Slow Clay Centre. Melbourne, Australia.

Slow Clay Centre is known for teaching the Japanese techniques of wheel throwing and that’s because I trained, in part, in Japan and really want others to learn the benefits of these wonderful techniques!

I trained to become a potter straight after finishing an art teaching degree where I majored in ceramics. I was introduced to Japanese techniques during a traditional 3‑year studio training with the wonderful potter, Andrew Halford, in Sydney and he then formally introduced me to fabulous pottery in Japan called Shussai Gama where I spent a further two years in hand-made production of studio pottery.

I also learned wood firing in a massive kiln, natural rock, and ash glazes, and mixing bespoke clays from local materials.

When I came back to Australia in 1990 I was surprised that no one was teaching the Japanese methods of wheel throwing because they are so wonderful! The methods enable a lovely workflow and have the added benefit of ergonomic positions.

So I started teaching these techniques initially to my own trainees, then in TAFE and University courses then in my small Fitzroy studio as a way to pass on the important things I had learnt. Now, three decades later, and having established Slow Clay Centre nine years ago, I am still teaching these techniques!

Over the years by using my educational background, I have been able to package what I have learnt into a logical and refined method. I have trained many, many potters over the decades in these techniques and since Slow Clay Centre started I have also trained others to teach these techniques under the Slow Clay name.

The lovely thing about it is you can see the difference in the pottery! The pots are immediately fresher and more expressive whilst also allowing for refinement as the student develops their skills.

Wine is as much an intellectual pleasure as it is a sensory one. Wine works on many levels, wine aids digestion, and wine stimulates civilized conversation.

Matthew Hansen, Founder at Fine Wine Appreciation. Melbourne, Australia.

I teach wine appreciation because of the pleasure that wine gives to people. The pleasure that I speak of I see that all the time around the table be it in a wine class or a wine dinner.

Wine is as much an intellectual pleasure as it is a sensory one. Wine works on many levels, wine aids digestion, and wine stimulates civilized conversation.

I’m particularly a fan of Louis Pasteur’s saying: “A meal without wine is like a day without sunshine. With food wine is not just an accompaniment but a part of the meal.

Trying to explain something so mysterious as wine is doomed to failure, it must be experienced. Hence that is why I decided 30 years ago to become a wine educator.

I was screaming out for a creative outlet and became really interested in the art of taxidermy when I found out that you had not been able to learn it in Australia since the 1970s

Natalie Delaney-John, Founder at Rest in Pieces. Melbourne, Australia.

When I first decided that I wanted to learn taxidermy it came from the simplest of curiosities. I was screaming out for a creative outlet and became really interested in the art of taxidermy when I found out that you had not been able to learn it in Australia since the 1970s.

In order to get involved in the industry I harassed a mentor for 3 months until he took me on. I then spent every weekend there for 3 years to pick up some basic skills and also travelled to Spain where I was fortunate enough to help build some works for a museum on the history of hunting.

Upon my return to Australia, I wondered if there was anyone else like me that might want to learn. That is how Rest in Pieces (RIP) was born.

We believe that wine-course education and events is a great way to increase our database and connect with people who really want to delve into fine wine (our main offering) as well as have participants understand our passion and commitment towards our vocation

Phil Hude, Founder at Armadale Cellars. Perth, Australia.

I met Demi and Kym soon after the formation of WeTeachMe after seeing the concept raised in the press and straightway thought, “This is the new version of the “Centre for Adult Education”!” The Centre for Adult Education is an old-time paper version of education that was released bi-annually and hosted many courses in Melbourne city center for decades, and where wine courses, amongst many others, were sold to the general public. I thought the WeTeachMe concept was a great way to offer wine classes and workshops to the world.

We are first and foremost wine merchants/retailers. As part of the “marketing mix and offering” we believe that wine-course education and events is a great way to increase our database and connect with people who really want to delve into fine wine (our main offering) as well as have participants understand our passion and commitment towards our vocation. During COVID-19, wine Zoom tastings (6 x 187 ml wine bottles) became a reality and were incredibly popular adding another style of forum that we believe is now here to stay!

We found our classes grew from not only for teaching the basics, but for creating classes for advanced decorators wanting to upskill and learn how to use new cake tools in the market

Rachel Gilbert, National Retail Manager at Bake Boss. Sydney, Australia.

With the first Bake Boss retail store opening over 9 years ago, there was a very high demand for cake decorating classes to teach beginners the tips, tricks, and techniques required to master the basics for decorating cakes, cupcakes, and even cookies.

We found our classes grew from not only for teaching the basics but for creating classes for advanced decorators wanting to upskill and learn how to use new cake tools in the market.

We also introduced kids classes for the young creative generation, with the skills taught setting them up to become advanced cake masters later in life!

As it turns out, cake decorating is not only skillful but super fun for all ages!

I never wanted to be a teacher but on the set of an ABC TV production in 1993, an actor said to me, “You direct in a different way to other directors. I want to learn how you do that.”

Richard Sarell, Director and Creator of The Rehearsal Room (Acting Process). Melbourne, Australia.

I never wanted to be a teacher but on the set of an ABC TV production in 1993, an actor said to me, “You direct in a different way to other directors. I want to learn how you do that.”

I cautiously took up the offer to run an acting class.

Seven years later that hesitant step had turned into a full-time job and I had discovered that I was a good teacher. Now I am about to publish my first book on a new and uniquely practical acting technique.

An offer rejected is an opportunity missed. Say “yes”!

We use our gelato classes as an educational tool so that people understand our product, can meet the people being the scenes who make the gelato, and so people get a special insight into how we do things at Gelato Messina

Sian Bishop, Brand and Marketing Manager at Gelato Messina. Melbourne Australia.

Messina has been running gelato classes for over 10 years now! We started them as we put so much effort into making our product the best we can, and we wanted to show people what goes on behind the scenes.

We use our gelato classes as an educational tool so that people understand our product, can meet the people being the scenes who make the gelato, and so people get a special insight into how we do things at Gelato Messina.

We also can’t think of a better way to spend a Saturday morning than indulging in a gelato class!

Working with clay is like mediation in a way, it’s a beautiful way to center the mind from this fast pace life a lot of us live. My studio is a sanctuary for students to enjoy, to be inspired, and to create.

Sarah Schembri, Director of Sarah Schembri Ceramics. Melbourne, Australia.

I’ve been teaching for approximately 10 years at other studios. It wasn’t until I moved into my new larger studio in Fitzroy, Melbourne 4 years ago that I fully appreciated just what I could offer and certainly, never envisioned my classes would be in such demand as they are.

I really love teaching and sharing my knowledge and experiences. Seeing student development each week and learning new skills–and knowing I had a part in this–is very rewarding to me.

Working with clay is like mediation in a way, it’s a beautiful way to centre the mind from this fast pace life a lot of us live. My studio is a sanctuary for students to enjoy, to be inspired, and create.

I love that I’m not “just” a music teacher. My tiny students learn real-life skills such as sharing, turn-taking, motor control, and their parents concurrently gain an insight into how their children learn.

Sophie Maxwell, Founder, and Teacher at Leaning Note. Melbourne, Australia.

I had been a violin and viola teacher for 7 years when I had the experience of teaching a 2‑year-old viola. Whilst the experience was one that I consider successful, and whilst the 2‑year-old still learns from me 8 years later, I thought that there had to be an easier way to teach younger students.

I was lost at a Suzuki music conference one rainy day and stumbled across a baby and toddler class, and was immediately hooked! I couldn’t believe how involved those tiny children were, and what they were achieving.

I love that I’m not “just” a music teacher. My tiny students learn real-life skills such as sharing, turn-taking, motor control, and their parents concurrently gain an insight into how their children learn.

It’s an amazing process to be a part of, and after 8 years, I’m still enthralled by it!

What do you think?

Do you agree or violently disagree with anything shared in this article? Or do you have any of your own stories that you want to share? Pop them in the comments and I will personally reply.

Call to action 

My goal is to help 1,000,000 people. My wish is to have these articles shared 1,000,000 times through the various social networks. For this reason, I provide this collection online for free and all I ask of you is this: If any of these articles have helped you in any way, please take a moment to share on social media, email to someone you think will find benefit, or print and leave it on the desk of someone whom you believe has the motivation, but lacks the tools to take themselves to the next level.

Don’t miss out on any new articles. Subscribe via email using the form at the bottom of this post and I’ll have the articles delivered straight to your inbox. Alternatively, you can also follow me on my various social media accounts: FacebookInstagramLinkedIn, and Twitter.